More recently however, we’ve begun seeing a sharp rise in VR-enabled video, driven by the increased appeal of VR handset devices such as Google Cardboard and Samsung Gear, along with platforms such as Facebook and YouTube now offering 360˚ viewing capabilities.

In November, the New York Times gave away more than a million Google Cardboard virtual reality viewers to its home delivery subscribers and has been producing some great VR entertainment content for its NYT VR app ever since.

We’re also now seeing more augmented information overlays on everything from print advertising to art, buildings, retail environments and product packaging, driven by improvements in the technology and our insatiable appetite for mobile apps. 

In the events industry, VR and AR is mainly being championed by brands in sectors with a vested interest in giving their audiences more immersive experiences, such as automotive, consumer electronics, tourism and entertainment.

 

 

A New Dawn for Virtual and Augmented Reality, published by venuefinder.com, looks in detail at how VR and AR is currently being used by agencies, venues and the wider events industry, plus how the launch of PC-powered virtual headsets from the likes of Oculus Rift, Sony and HTC will change the way we shop, how we travel, how we’re entertained and how we seek out new information.

AR may have stumbled when Google Glass failed to take-off in 2014 but this new VR dawn will bring with it a renewed interest in all forms of technology-driven content.

Download this free whitepaper brought to you by venuefinder.com - the UK's number one venue finding platform.